Laceleaf Japanese Maple is an unusually beautiful plant that can fill the garden with the brightest colors, and the leaves of numerous species and subspecies of these amazing plants have a rich spectrum of shades. 

However, when planting this decorative miracle and in the process of further caring for them, it is important to take into account a number of their inherent features. 

Only then can the health, splendor and beauty of these wonderful Japanese “guests” be guaranteed.

Features of the Laceleaf Japanese Maple

Regarding the general description of the Laceleaf Japanese Maple, we note that this is a collective name. In fact, this name covers many species that grow in their homeland – in Japan and South Korea.

 Japanese Maple

Maples belong to the sapind family (genus maple). There are about 150 varieties of them, some of them penetrated into our lands from Southeast Asia.

Maple tree leaves:

  • rounded, serrated (with oblique small teeth), oppositely located, with a diameter of up to 15 cm;
  • cut by almost 1/2 of the diameter or more (by grade);
  • 7-, 9- or 11-part;
  • keep on thin petioles about 5 cm long;
  • the color can be green (in summer), bright carmine, poisonous scarlet, crimson with yellow and orange inclusions (in autumn);
  • the name of the plants was determined by the shape of the leaf – palm-leaved, fan-shaped or palm-shaped.
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During the flowering period (April-June), the flowers are slightly pubescent, located in long shields, up to 3 cm long. The color can be bright purple-red or pale green-yellow. Then they transform into lionfish hanging under the leaves.

Popular species and varieties

Due to the significant distribution of maples in gardening and landscape design, quite a lot of its species and varieties have appeared. Such a variety of its varieties allows you to make the desired choice for the ideal compositional solution of the site. Nevertheless, there are 3 leading types of maples:

  • palm-shaped, or fan-shaped, or palm-leaved;
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  • Shirasawa maple (shirasawanum);
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  • proper Japanese (japonicum).
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Other subspecies and varieties (red-leaved, holly, frost-resistant and others) are distinguished among them.

  • The Shirasawa maple is a type of dwarf shrub (height no more than 1.5 m). The plant is broad-leaved, acquiring a bright yellow color with an orange-red tint in autumn. There are several subspecies of it.
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  • Beni Kawa – in autumn it looks like a red flame (red-leaved) in the garden. It has a ruby ​​bark and rich, juicy red foliage.
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  • “Katsura” (Katsura) – a variety with leaves of golden lemon color.
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  • Bloodgood is a rare subspecies with dark foliage.
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  • “Mikawa yatsubusi” (Mikawa yatsubusa) – undersized shrub with needle-shaped leaves, bright green in summer, and orange-scarlet in autumn.
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  • “Atropurpureum” (Atropurpureum) – with an umbrella-shaped crown, gorgeous looking and without leaves. The foliage is purple in summer. It can reach a length of 3-4 m. it is often grown in large garden containers.
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  • Aconitifolium (Aconitifolium) – with beautifully carved leaves cut to the base. With foliage of bright green color in summer, in autumn – crimson-scarlet.
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  • “Dissectum” (Dissectum) – with filigree finger-dissected foliage, having 5, 7 or 9 serrated protrusions up to 12 cm. In the summer with a rich red-brown color. In autumn, a brighter carmine red with various inclusions of yellow, purple, bronze color
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  • “Shaina” (Shaina) – low-growing species, with a maximum height of 1.5 m. With long palm-shaped, cut leaves, with a dense, bushy and dense crown. Requires regular pruning for good ventilation. 
    • The shapes are spherical, holds the formative cut well. In the fall of a bright blood-red color scheme, focusing all the attention on itself. 
    • It is often placed in large containers in the corners of garden areas. They can often be seen in hotel lobbies, on terraces and verandas.
  • Kiyohime is ideal, including indoor species for bonsai and potted growth. An example of a dwarf slow-growing variety with a maximum length of 1.8 m.
    • It has carved palm-like leaves with small thin tips. In the central part of the leaf there are pale green shades, along the edges – bright red and yellow.
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  • “Aka shigitatsu sawa” is an original and unusually beautiful subspecies, remarkable for its spread-out carved leaves that retain their rich greenish shades for a long time. 
    • However, the veins and margins are bright red or yellow. The leaves look like palms with translucent veins and capillaries. Dense crown requiring regular pruning. The culture is high, capable of reaching 3 m in length.
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  • “Wilson” s Pink Dwarf is an ornamental subspecies of maple, growing up to 2.5 m, with beautiful red foliage in autumn. In the sunlight, it plays with orange hues.
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  • “Shirazz” is an extremely spectacular subspecies, with deeply dissected green leaves bordered with a bright crimson stripe. In autumn, they turn purple in color.
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The Laceleaf Japanese Maple Landing

If you do not have time for seeds, buy seedlings, which during the planting season should be carefully examined when buying for the presence of diseases and strength. Weak seedlings usually do not take root.

Saplings love competent and careful planting, taking into account all the features that this delicate plant possesses.

  • You should choose non-alkaline soils, with light moisture, without water stagnation . Drainage of the soil is mandatory.
  • It is better to choose a landing site with light shade, but periodic penetration of direct sunlight into the area.
  • Avoiding drafts is considered an important point when landing . Maple trees should be planted near walls, hedges, or covering them with conifers.

If you are planting a number of seedlings, then they should be spaced apart from each other at a distance of 2-3 m, since maples have rather spreading crowns.

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Basic landing rules:

  • in-depth, the planting hole should be 2 times the root system of the seedling;
  • for clay soil, add sand;
  • we lower the seedling into the rooting solution for about 15 minutes;
  • then we place it in the hole, gently spreading the roots;
  • sprinkle with the previously harvested soil mixture (earth, peat and compost);
  • we make out the near-barrel circle, tamping it;
  • water abundantly;
  • we apply fertilizers the next day;
  • we mulch the trunk circle.
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Care for The Laceleaf Japanese Maple

Laceleaf Japanese Maple is not considered an unpretentious plant to care for, since its homeland is the East, where climatic conditions are milder and warmer. 

Therefore, growing it in cold regions in the open field is a rather troublesome event. You can take care of the plant according to a specific plan.

  • Watering . Water it abundantly and regularly. The volume is determined based on precipitation and weather conditions. The trunk circle should not be allowed to dry out. 
    • At the same time, you need to ensure that the water does not stagnate in it. In especially hot weather, it is recommended to irrigate the crown with warm water in the evenings.
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  • Top dressing . The plant is clearly not indifferent to nutritious soils, and therefore it is fed with complex mineral fertilizers, applied both during planting and then regularly. It is preferable that nitrogen is not included in the added compounds.
  • Mulching is a mandatory procedure, since it prevents the trunk circle from drying out, helps to save the root system from various harmful influences. 
    • For mulching, conventional materials are used: pine needles, sawdust, peat material, composts, fallen dry leaves, etc. In addition to the practical purpose, this event also carries a considerable aesthetic load – a tree groomed in this way looks quite elegant.
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  • During the first 3-4 years, The Laceleaf Japanese Maple needs formative pruning if you want to increase its decorative qualities. Otherwise, the branches will begin to grow erratically, the crowns will begin to thicken, the ventilation system will be disrupted. 
    • As a result, the leaves will begin to dry out, the resistance of plants to diseases will decrease, and the risk of fungal infections will increase.

  • After 4-5 years of growth, it is not necessary to cut the plant – it will now take on its permanent form . However, in spring and autumn, dryish, diseased, damaged twigs and shoots that interfere with normal ventilation of the top should be cut off.
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  • When preparing the Laceleaf Japanese Maple for winter, remember that this plant is not frost-resistant. The maximum temperature it can survive in winter is -20 ° C, but only under careful cover. 
    • The best option would be to root it in a tub: in the spring we take it out into the street, and in the fall we return it indoors. When wintering on the street, we think about protective measures in the fall, after the leaves have fallen: we mulch the trunk circle with peat or compost (5-7 cm), cover the open part with needles or burlap. 
    • Maple trees in cold regions will not survive the winter without shelter. Even having taken the full range of necessary protective measures, one cannot be sure that the plants will wake up in the spring – they are too delicate.

Laceleaf Japanese Maple is often grown on the trunk of the common maple. But such cultivation and care is only suitable for experienced gardeners.

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Reproduction methods

There are two possible breeding options for the Laceleaf Japanese Maple tree.

Seeds

It is not so difficult to propagate Laceleaf Japanese Maple by seeds at home – one of the best ways:

  • soak the seeds for 2-3 hours;
  • we fill small containers (10×10 cm) with fertile soil;
  • we lay the seeds at a depth of about 5 cm (each seed has a separate hole);
  • cover with foil or glass;
  • we remove in a lighted place, but without direct sunlight;
  • every day for 2-3 hours we remove the shelters (for ventilation);
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  • we wait for the first leaves and plant the seedlings in open soil (or in a tub).

You can order high quality seeds from SEEDSNOW.

Cuttings

Reproduction of Laceleaf Japanese Maple by cuttings is troublesome and not one hundred per cent. The survival rate with this method is rather low compared to a seed.

  • In spring, we choose strong, but young branches, on which the bark has not yet formed.
  • At their bases, we make annular cuts for the development of the root system.
  • Slightly higher (2-3 cm) we make a similar incision.
  • We remove the thin skin between them.
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  • Apply a root-forming hormone to the prepared place. They are available in powder or gel form.
  • We attach sphagnum (previously abundantly moistened) moss to the treated area to activate hormones.
  • Cover the place with a piece of polyethylene. We leave the workpiece in a shaded and cool place.
  • After 3-4 weeks, the roots begin to appear through the bandage.
  • Remove the bandage. The stalk that gave the roots is planted in the ground.

Diseases and pests

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Speaking about the treatment and prevention of diseases of the Laceleaf Japanese Maple, we note that insect pests are not dangerous for them – maples are not to their taste. But the gall mite is a different matter. 

The twigs dry up, and the leaves lose their color. In such cases, the affected areas are eliminated, and the tree is treated with insecticides. Somewhat less often, trees are attacked by maple leaf weevils or whiteflies.

Powdery mildew is a dangerous fungal enemy. To protect the Japanese “guest” from her, it is necessary to plant him away from the fruit and berry bushes. If infection has occurred, then repeated (2-3 times) fungicidal treatment will be required.

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Application in landscape design

Our Japanese “guests” are especially popular in landscape design – and not only in private plots, but also in city parks.

Possible applications:

  • in original garden compositions;
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  • like bonsai;
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  • in the form of an accented figure in the front gardens;
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  • in rockeries, mixborders and alpine slides;
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  • in decorative edging of reservoirs;
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  • in Japanese gardens;
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  • for growing in containers and pots, transferred from one place to another.
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As part of a one-time composition, Laceleaf Japanese Maple is in perfect harmony with ivy, honeysuckle, clematis, azalea, magnolia and hydrangea.

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At home, “Laceleaf Japanese Maple” perfectly moisturizes and enriches the microclimate with oxygen. 

It is an excellent neighbor for other horticultural crops, shrubs and cereals, since its moderate root system does not contribute to the oppression of nearby plants.

Taking into account that rockeries, alpine and Japanese gardens, green roofs have become widespread in recent years, Japanese “guests” may well become pearls in the listed ways of arranging free spaces.